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artlog:

The Seaworthy Sculpture of David McQueen
Today, the seas have been charted, the lands all found, and even the moon is only a stone’s throw away.  But David McQueen’s A Once Imagined Ocean, his first solo exhibition at the Kim Foster Gallery running through October 4, reminds us of the wonder that the ocean once held as the frontier of unknown territories. 
On the wall directly facing the gallery entrance, McQueen presents a collection of sea-worthy objects, all crafted in the nostalgic media of etched brass, mahogany and birch, and glass.  They’re not necessarily functional tools, although some closely resemble navigational charts, sextants, or telescopes.  McQueen is obviously a skilled craftsman as well as artist, and the appeal of these pieces lies largely in their tactile, mechanical, weighty resonance.
The show isn’t only a reminder of an earlier time, an earlier mode of transportation, exploration, and commerce.  It’s also a dreamy, imaginative exploration of the wonder that the sea can still hold.  
 
David McQueen, Breaching Pod, laminated birch and plywood, 36 3/4 x 24 3/4 inches. (c) 2014 David McQueen.  Photo by Aaron Mayper
In Breaching Pod, thin planks of birch and plywood bulge from a smooth plane to form the hulls and keels of three small boats, or perhaps the backs and dorsal fins of a couple of dolphins or whales.   
 
David McQueen, Balikbayan Boat, basswood and brass, 78x96x9 inches. (c) 2014 David McQueen. Photo courtesy Kim Foster Gallery.

David McQueen, The Not So Subtle Distinction Between Safety And Peril That Is Afforded By A Combination Of Perspective And Will, wood, plaster, fiberglass, steel, 6x6x10 ft. (c) 2014 David McQueen. Photo by Aaron Mayper.
This ambiguity of vessel-or-creature is central to many of McQueen’s works.  In Balikbayan Boat, a basswood and brass piece, a canoe-like boat warps, stretches, and twists until it becomes almost eel-like.  And The Not So Subtle Distinction Between Safety And Peril That Is Afforded By A Combination Of Perspective And Will features a group of miniature row boats, circling round and round like a school of fish.
These pieces are like the daydreams of a ship’s captain, where his own vessel takes on the shifting qualities of the creatures that swim beneath him. 
A Once Imagined Ocean is on display at the Kim Foster Gallery, 529 W. 20th st., through October 4.
All photos courtesy kimfostergallery.com unless otherwise noted.
-Aaron Mayper
artlog:

The Seaworthy Sculpture of David McQueen
Today, the seas have been charted, the lands all found, and even the moon is only a stone’s throw away.  But David McQueen’s A Once Imagined Ocean, his first solo exhibition at the Kim Foster Gallery running through October 4, reminds us of the wonder that the ocean once held as the frontier of unknown territories. 
On the wall directly facing the gallery entrance, McQueen presents a collection of sea-worthy objects, all crafted in the nostalgic media of etched brass, mahogany and birch, and glass.  They’re not necessarily functional tools, although some closely resemble navigational charts, sextants, or telescopes.  McQueen is obviously a skilled craftsman as well as artist, and the appeal of these pieces lies largely in their tactile, mechanical, weighty resonance.
The show isn’t only a reminder of an earlier time, an earlier mode of transportation, exploration, and commerce.  It’s also a dreamy, imaginative exploration of the wonder that the sea can still hold.  
 
David McQueen, Breaching Pod, laminated birch and plywood, 36 3/4 x 24 3/4 inches. (c) 2014 David McQueen.  Photo by Aaron Mayper
In Breaching Pod, thin planks of birch and plywood bulge from a smooth plane to form the hulls and keels of three small boats, or perhaps the backs and dorsal fins of a couple of dolphins or whales.   
 
David McQueen, Balikbayan Boat, basswood and brass, 78x96x9 inches. (c) 2014 David McQueen. Photo courtesy Kim Foster Gallery.

David McQueen, The Not So Subtle Distinction Between Safety And Peril That Is Afforded By A Combination Of Perspective And Will, wood, plaster, fiberglass, steel, 6x6x10 ft. (c) 2014 David McQueen. Photo by Aaron Mayper.
This ambiguity of vessel-or-creature is central to many of McQueen’s works.  In Balikbayan Boat, a basswood and brass piece, a canoe-like boat warps, stretches, and twists until it becomes almost eel-like.  And The Not So Subtle Distinction Between Safety And Peril That Is Afforded By A Combination Of Perspective And Will features a group of miniature row boats, circling round and round like a school of fish.
These pieces are like the daydreams of a ship’s captain, where his own vessel takes on the shifting qualities of the creatures that swim beneath him. 
A Once Imagined Ocean is on display at the Kim Foster Gallery, 529 W. 20th st., through October 4.
All photos courtesy kimfostergallery.com unless otherwise noted.
-Aaron Mayper
artlog:

The Seaworthy Sculpture of David McQueen
Today, the seas have been charted, the lands all found, and even the moon is only a stone’s throw away.  But David McQueen’s A Once Imagined Ocean, his first solo exhibition at the Kim Foster Gallery running through October 4, reminds us of the wonder that the ocean once held as the frontier of unknown territories. 
On the wall directly facing the gallery entrance, McQueen presents a collection of sea-worthy objects, all crafted in the nostalgic media of etched brass, mahogany and birch, and glass.  They’re not necessarily functional tools, although some closely resemble navigational charts, sextants, or telescopes.  McQueen is obviously a skilled craftsman as well as artist, and the appeal of these pieces lies largely in their tactile, mechanical, weighty resonance.
The show isn’t only a reminder of an earlier time, an earlier mode of transportation, exploration, and commerce.  It’s also a dreamy, imaginative exploration of the wonder that the sea can still hold.  
 
David McQueen, Breaching Pod, laminated birch and plywood, 36 3/4 x 24 3/4 inches. (c) 2014 David McQueen.  Photo by Aaron Mayper
In Breaching Pod, thin planks of birch and plywood bulge from a smooth plane to form the hulls and keels of three small boats, or perhaps the backs and dorsal fins of a couple of dolphins or whales.   
 
David McQueen, Balikbayan Boat, basswood and brass, 78x96x9 inches. (c) 2014 David McQueen. Photo courtesy Kim Foster Gallery.

David McQueen, The Not So Subtle Distinction Between Safety And Peril That Is Afforded By A Combination Of Perspective And Will, wood, plaster, fiberglass, steel, 6x6x10 ft. (c) 2014 David McQueen. Photo by Aaron Mayper.
This ambiguity of vessel-or-creature is central to many of McQueen’s works.  In Balikbayan Boat, a basswood and brass piece, a canoe-like boat warps, stretches, and twists until it becomes almost eel-like.  And The Not So Subtle Distinction Between Safety And Peril That Is Afforded By A Combination Of Perspective And Will features a group of miniature row boats, circling round and round like a school of fish.
These pieces are like the daydreams of a ship’s captain, where his own vessel takes on the shifting qualities of the creatures that swim beneath him. 
A Once Imagined Ocean is on display at the Kim Foster Gallery, 529 W. 20th st., through October 4.
All photos courtesy kimfostergallery.com unless otherwise noted.
-Aaron Mayper

artlog:

The Seaworthy Sculpture of David McQueen

Today, the seas have been charted, the lands all found, and even the moon is only a stone’s throw away.  But David McQueen’s A Once Imagined Ocean, his first solo exhibition at the Kim Foster Gallery running through October 4, reminds us of the wonder that the ocean once held as the frontier of unknown territories. 

On the wall directly facing the gallery entrance, McQueen presents a collection of sea-worthy objects, all crafted in the nostalgic media of etched brass, mahogany and birch, and glass.  They’re not necessarily functional tools, although some closely resemble navigational charts, sextants, or telescopes.  McQueen is obviously a skilled craftsman as well as artist, and the appeal of these pieces lies largely in their tactile, mechanical, weighty resonance.

The show isn’t only a reminder of an earlier time, an earlier mode of transportation, exploration, and commerce.  It’s also a dreamy, imaginative exploration of the wonder that the sea can still hold. 

 

David McQueen, Breaching Pod, laminated birch and plywood, 36 3/4 x 24 3/4 inches. (c) 2014 David McQueen.  Photo by Aaron Mayper

In Breaching Pod, thin planks of birch and plywood bulge from a smooth plane to form the hulls and keels of three small boats, or perhaps the backs and dorsal fins of a couple of dolphins or whales.  

 

David McQueen, Balikbayan Boat, basswood and brass, 78x96x9 inches. (c) 2014 David McQueen. Photo courtesy Kim Foster Gallery.

David McQueen, The Not So Subtle Distinction Between Safety And Peril That Is Afforded By A Combination Of Perspective And Will, wood, plaster, fiberglass, steel, 6x6x10 ft. (c) 2014 David McQueen. Photo by Aaron Mayper.

This ambiguity of vessel-or-creature is central to many of McQueen’s works.  In Balikbayan Boat, a basswood and brass piece, a canoe-like boat warps, stretches, and twists until it becomes almost eel-like.  And The Not So Subtle Distinction Between Safety And Peril That Is Afforded By A Combination Of Perspective And Will features a group of miniature row boats, circling round and round like a school of fish.

These pieces are like the daydreams of a ship’s captain, where his own vessel takes on the shifting qualities of the creatures that swim beneath him. 

A Once Imagined Ocean is on display at the Kim Foster Gallery, 529 W. 20th st., through October 4.

All photos courtesy kimfostergallery.com unless otherwise noted.

-Aaron Mayper

archatlas:

Eladio Dieste
"I studied engineering because I am interested physics astronomy - I am fascinated by the posibility of understanding reality through the physical mathematical language." Eladio Dieste
“In an industry so often enamored by media-coddled superstars with trendy clients, Eladio Dieste stands out as a refreshing and inspiring figure. Born in Uruguay, Dieste spent most of his long and productive career creating industrial and agrarian works, public infrastructure, commercial buildings, and small churches in his native country. Dieste’s unique and innovative method of design, a melding of architecture and engineering, elevated these often humble buildings to masterworks of art. Capitalizing on his revolutionary approach to building with reinforced masonry, Dieste built aesthetically stunning structures economically. If he often worked outside the architectural mainstream, he never lost sight of the modest people for whom his structures were built.” Eladio Dieste: Innovation in Structural Art by Stanford Anderson
Images found here.
Thanks Sam for reminding me of Dieste!
archatlas:

Eladio Dieste
"I studied engineering because I am interested physics astronomy - I am fascinated by the posibility of understanding reality through the physical mathematical language." Eladio Dieste
“In an industry so often enamored by media-coddled superstars with trendy clients, Eladio Dieste stands out as a refreshing and inspiring figure. Born in Uruguay, Dieste spent most of his long and productive career creating industrial and agrarian works, public infrastructure, commercial buildings, and small churches in his native country. Dieste’s unique and innovative method of design, a melding of architecture and engineering, elevated these often humble buildings to masterworks of art. Capitalizing on his revolutionary approach to building with reinforced masonry, Dieste built aesthetically stunning structures economically. If he often worked outside the architectural mainstream, he never lost sight of the modest people for whom his structures were built.” Eladio Dieste: Innovation in Structural Art by Stanford Anderson
Images found here.
Thanks Sam for reminding me of Dieste!
archatlas:

Eladio Dieste
"I studied engineering because I am interested physics astronomy - I am fascinated by the posibility of understanding reality through the physical mathematical language." Eladio Dieste
“In an industry so often enamored by media-coddled superstars with trendy clients, Eladio Dieste stands out as a refreshing and inspiring figure. Born in Uruguay, Dieste spent most of his long and productive career creating industrial and agrarian works, public infrastructure, commercial buildings, and small churches in his native country. Dieste’s unique and innovative method of design, a melding of architecture and engineering, elevated these often humble buildings to masterworks of art. Capitalizing on his revolutionary approach to building with reinforced masonry, Dieste built aesthetically stunning structures economically. If he often worked outside the architectural mainstream, he never lost sight of the modest people for whom his structures were built.” Eladio Dieste: Innovation in Structural Art by Stanford Anderson
Images found here.
Thanks Sam for reminding me of Dieste!
archatlas:

Eladio Dieste
"I studied engineering because I am interested physics astronomy - I am fascinated by the posibility of understanding reality through the physical mathematical language." Eladio Dieste
“In an industry so often enamored by media-coddled superstars with trendy clients, Eladio Dieste stands out as a refreshing and inspiring figure. Born in Uruguay, Dieste spent most of his long and productive career creating industrial and agrarian works, public infrastructure, commercial buildings, and small churches in his native country. Dieste’s unique and innovative method of design, a melding of architecture and engineering, elevated these often humble buildings to masterworks of art. Capitalizing on his revolutionary approach to building with reinforced masonry, Dieste built aesthetically stunning structures economically. If he often worked outside the architectural mainstream, he never lost sight of the modest people for whom his structures were built.” Eladio Dieste: Innovation in Structural Art by Stanford Anderson
Images found here.
Thanks Sam for reminding me of Dieste!
archatlas:

Eladio Dieste
"I studied engineering because I am interested physics astronomy - I am fascinated by the posibility of understanding reality through the physical mathematical language." Eladio Dieste
“In an industry so often enamored by media-coddled superstars with trendy clients, Eladio Dieste stands out as a refreshing and inspiring figure. Born in Uruguay, Dieste spent most of his long and productive career creating industrial and agrarian works, public infrastructure, commercial buildings, and small churches in his native country. Dieste’s unique and innovative method of design, a melding of architecture and engineering, elevated these often humble buildings to masterworks of art. Capitalizing on his revolutionary approach to building with reinforced masonry, Dieste built aesthetically stunning structures economically. If he often worked outside the architectural mainstream, he never lost sight of the modest people for whom his structures were built.” Eladio Dieste: Innovation in Structural Art by Stanford Anderson
Images found here.
Thanks Sam for reminding me of Dieste!
archatlas:

Eladio Dieste
"I studied engineering because I am interested physics astronomy - I am fascinated by the posibility of understanding reality through the physical mathematical language." Eladio Dieste
“In an industry so often enamored by media-coddled superstars with trendy clients, Eladio Dieste stands out as a refreshing and inspiring figure. Born in Uruguay, Dieste spent most of his long and productive career creating industrial and agrarian works, public infrastructure, commercial buildings, and small churches in his native country. Dieste’s unique and innovative method of design, a melding of architecture and engineering, elevated these often humble buildings to masterworks of art. Capitalizing on his revolutionary approach to building with reinforced masonry, Dieste built aesthetically stunning structures economically. If he often worked outside the architectural mainstream, he never lost sight of the modest people for whom his structures were built.” Eladio Dieste: Innovation in Structural Art by Stanford Anderson
Images found here.
Thanks Sam for reminding me of Dieste!
archatlas:

Eladio Dieste
"I studied engineering because I am interested physics astronomy - I am fascinated by the posibility of understanding reality through the physical mathematical language." Eladio Dieste
“In an industry so often enamored by media-coddled superstars with trendy clients, Eladio Dieste stands out as a refreshing and inspiring figure. Born in Uruguay, Dieste spent most of his long and productive career creating industrial and agrarian works, public infrastructure, commercial buildings, and small churches in his native country. Dieste’s unique and innovative method of design, a melding of architecture and engineering, elevated these often humble buildings to masterworks of art. Capitalizing on his revolutionary approach to building with reinforced masonry, Dieste built aesthetically stunning structures economically. If he often worked outside the architectural mainstream, he never lost sight of the modest people for whom his structures were built.” Eladio Dieste: Innovation in Structural Art by Stanford Anderson
Images found here.
Thanks Sam for reminding me of Dieste!
archatlas:

Eladio Dieste
"I studied engineering because I am interested physics astronomy - I am fascinated by the posibility of understanding reality through the physical mathematical language." Eladio Dieste
“In an industry so often enamored by media-coddled superstars with trendy clients, Eladio Dieste stands out as a refreshing and inspiring figure. Born in Uruguay, Dieste spent most of his long and productive career creating industrial and agrarian works, public infrastructure, commercial buildings, and small churches in his native country. Dieste’s unique and innovative method of design, a melding of architecture and engineering, elevated these often humble buildings to masterworks of art. Capitalizing on his revolutionary approach to building with reinforced masonry, Dieste built aesthetically stunning structures economically. If he often worked outside the architectural mainstream, he never lost sight of the modest people for whom his structures were built.” Eladio Dieste: Innovation in Structural Art by Stanford Anderson
Images found here.
Thanks Sam for reminding me of Dieste!
archatlas:

Eladio Dieste
"I studied engineering because I am interested physics astronomy - I am fascinated by the posibility of understanding reality through the physical mathematical language." Eladio Dieste
“In an industry so often enamored by media-coddled superstars with trendy clients, Eladio Dieste stands out as a refreshing and inspiring figure. Born in Uruguay, Dieste spent most of his long and productive career creating industrial and agrarian works, public infrastructure, commercial buildings, and small churches in his native country. Dieste’s unique and innovative method of design, a melding of architecture and engineering, elevated these often humble buildings to masterworks of art. Capitalizing on his revolutionary approach to building with reinforced masonry, Dieste built aesthetically stunning structures economically. If he often worked outside the architectural mainstream, he never lost sight of the modest people for whom his structures were built.” Eladio Dieste: Innovation in Structural Art by Stanford Anderson
Images found here.
Thanks Sam for reminding me of Dieste!
archatlas:

Eladio Dieste
"I studied engineering because I am interested physics astronomy - I am fascinated by the posibility of understanding reality through the physical mathematical language." Eladio Dieste
“In an industry so often enamored by media-coddled superstars with trendy clients, Eladio Dieste stands out as a refreshing and inspiring figure. Born in Uruguay, Dieste spent most of his long and productive career creating industrial and agrarian works, public infrastructure, commercial buildings, and small churches in his native country. Dieste’s unique and innovative method of design, a melding of architecture and engineering, elevated these often humble buildings to masterworks of art. Capitalizing on his revolutionary approach to building with reinforced masonry, Dieste built aesthetically stunning structures economically. If he often worked outside the architectural mainstream, he never lost sight of the modest people for whom his structures were built.” Eladio Dieste: Innovation in Structural Art by Stanford Anderson
Images found here.
Thanks Sam for reminding me of Dieste!

archatlas:

Eladio Dieste

"I studied engineering because I am interested physics astronomy - I am fascinated by the posibility of understanding reality through the physical mathematical language." Eladio Dieste

In an industry so often enamored by media-coddled superstars with trendy clients, Eladio Dieste stands out as a refreshing and inspiring figure. Born in Uruguay, Dieste spent most of his long and productive career creating industrial and agrarian works, public infrastructure, commercial buildings, and small churches in his native country. Dieste’s unique and innovative method of design, a melding of architecture and engineering, elevated these often humble buildings to masterworks of art. Capitalizing on his revolutionary approach to building with reinforced masonry, Dieste built aesthetically stunning structures economically. If he often worked outside the architectural mainstream, he never lost sight of the modest people for whom his structures were built.” Eladio Dieste: Innovation in Structural Art by Stanford Anderson

Images found here.

Thanks Sam for reminding me of Dieste!

instagram:

Visiting the Vibrant, Colorful Cityscape Of Willemstad, Curaçao

For more vivid landscapes and architecture from the island of Curaçao, explore the Willemstad location page.

One of the first things visitors notice about Willemstad, the capitol of Curaçao, is its brightly colored houses. The Dutch-influenced architecture reflects the colonial history of the tiny island nation, located in the Caribbean Sea off the coast of Venezuela.

“The landscape and the people who live in this city are as diverse as they come,” says Gaby Lieuw (@sandandstilettos), who grew up in Curaçao and currently runs a travel service for tourists to the island. “Many people speak at least four languages fluently—Dutch, English, Spanish and the local language of Papiamento—and switch between them effortlessly throughout the day.”

According to Gaby, large music festivals are a defining feature of Willemstad, ranging from traditional tumba music to Bruno Mars. But one of the most memorable events that takes over the city center is Curaçao Pride, a celebration of LGBT community which runs from September 24 to 28. Visitors flock to Willemstad from all over the world to participate.

“Pride events on the island are getting bigger and better every year,” says Gaby. “Curaçaoans always know how to throw a good party.”
instagram:

Visiting the Vibrant, Colorful Cityscape Of Willemstad, Curaçao

For more vivid landscapes and architecture from the island of Curaçao, explore the Willemstad location page.

One of the first things visitors notice about Willemstad, the capitol of Curaçao, is its brightly colored houses. The Dutch-influenced architecture reflects the colonial history of the tiny island nation, located in the Caribbean Sea off the coast of Venezuela.

“The landscape and the people who live in this city are as diverse as they come,” says Gaby Lieuw (@sandandstilettos), who grew up in Curaçao and currently runs a travel service for tourists to the island. “Many people speak at least four languages fluently—Dutch, English, Spanish and the local language of Papiamento—and switch between them effortlessly throughout the day.”

According to Gaby, large music festivals are a defining feature of Willemstad, ranging from traditional tumba music to Bruno Mars. But one of the most memorable events that takes over the city center is Curaçao Pride, a celebration of LGBT community which runs from September 24 to 28. Visitors flock to Willemstad from all over the world to participate.

“Pride events on the island are getting bigger and better every year,” says Gaby. “Curaçaoans always know how to throw a good party.”
instagram:

Visiting the Vibrant, Colorful Cityscape Of Willemstad, Curaçao

For more vivid landscapes and architecture from the island of Curaçao, explore the Willemstad location page.

One of the first things visitors notice about Willemstad, the capitol of Curaçao, is its brightly colored houses. The Dutch-influenced architecture reflects the colonial history of the tiny island nation, located in the Caribbean Sea off the coast of Venezuela.

“The landscape and the people who live in this city are as diverse as they come,” says Gaby Lieuw (@sandandstilettos), who grew up in Curaçao and currently runs a travel service for tourists to the island. “Many people speak at least four languages fluently—Dutch, English, Spanish and the local language of Papiamento—and switch between them effortlessly throughout the day.”

According to Gaby, large music festivals are a defining feature of Willemstad, ranging from traditional tumba music to Bruno Mars. But one of the most memorable events that takes over the city center is Curaçao Pride, a celebration of LGBT community which runs from September 24 to 28. Visitors flock to Willemstad from all over the world to participate.

“Pride events on the island are getting bigger and better every year,” says Gaby. “Curaçaoans always know how to throw a good party.”
instagram:

Visiting the Vibrant, Colorful Cityscape Of Willemstad, Curaçao

For more vivid landscapes and architecture from the island of Curaçao, explore the Willemstad location page.

One of the first things visitors notice about Willemstad, the capitol of Curaçao, is its brightly colored houses. The Dutch-influenced architecture reflects the colonial history of the tiny island nation, located in the Caribbean Sea off the coast of Venezuela.

“The landscape and the people who live in this city are as diverse as they come,” says Gaby Lieuw (@sandandstilettos), who grew up in Curaçao and currently runs a travel service for tourists to the island. “Many people speak at least four languages fluently—Dutch, English, Spanish and the local language of Papiamento—and switch between them effortlessly throughout the day.”

According to Gaby, large music festivals are a defining feature of Willemstad, ranging from traditional tumba music to Bruno Mars. But one of the most memorable events that takes over the city center is Curaçao Pride, a celebration of LGBT community which runs from September 24 to 28. Visitors flock to Willemstad from all over the world to participate.

“Pride events on the island are getting bigger and better every year,” says Gaby. “Curaçaoans always know how to throw a good party.”
instagram:

Visiting the Vibrant, Colorful Cityscape Of Willemstad, Curaçao

For more vivid landscapes and architecture from the island of Curaçao, explore the Willemstad location page.

One of the first things visitors notice about Willemstad, the capitol of Curaçao, is its brightly colored houses. The Dutch-influenced architecture reflects the colonial history of the tiny island nation, located in the Caribbean Sea off the coast of Venezuela.

“The landscape and the people who live in this city are as diverse as they come,” says Gaby Lieuw (@sandandstilettos), who grew up in Curaçao and currently runs a travel service for tourists to the island. “Many people speak at least four languages fluently—Dutch, English, Spanish and the local language of Papiamento—and switch between them effortlessly throughout the day.”

According to Gaby, large music festivals are a defining feature of Willemstad, ranging from traditional tumba music to Bruno Mars. But one of the most memorable events that takes over the city center is Curaçao Pride, a celebration of LGBT community which runs from September 24 to 28. Visitors flock to Willemstad from all over the world to participate.

“Pride events on the island are getting bigger and better every year,” says Gaby. “Curaçaoans always know how to throw a good party.”
instagram:

Visiting the Vibrant, Colorful Cityscape Of Willemstad, Curaçao

For more vivid landscapes and architecture from the island of Curaçao, explore the Willemstad location page.

One of the first things visitors notice about Willemstad, the capitol of Curaçao, is its brightly colored houses. The Dutch-influenced architecture reflects the colonial history of the tiny island nation, located in the Caribbean Sea off the coast of Venezuela.

“The landscape and the people who live in this city are as diverse as they come,” says Gaby Lieuw (@sandandstilettos), who grew up in Curaçao and currently runs a travel service for tourists to the island. “Many people speak at least four languages fluently—Dutch, English, Spanish and the local language of Papiamento—and switch between them effortlessly throughout the day.”

According to Gaby, large music festivals are a defining feature of Willemstad, ranging from traditional tumba music to Bruno Mars. But one of the most memorable events that takes over the city center is Curaçao Pride, a celebration of LGBT community which runs from September 24 to 28. Visitors flock to Willemstad from all over the world to participate.

“Pride events on the island are getting bigger and better every year,” says Gaby. “Curaçaoans always know how to throw a good party.”
instagram:

Visiting the Vibrant, Colorful Cityscape Of Willemstad, Curaçao

For more vivid landscapes and architecture from the island of Curaçao, explore the Willemstad location page.

One of the first things visitors notice about Willemstad, the capitol of Curaçao, is its brightly colored houses. The Dutch-influenced architecture reflects the colonial history of the tiny island nation, located in the Caribbean Sea off the coast of Venezuela.

“The landscape and the people who live in this city are as diverse as they come,” says Gaby Lieuw (@sandandstilettos), who grew up in Curaçao and currently runs a travel service for tourists to the island. “Many people speak at least four languages fluently—Dutch, English, Spanish and the local language of Papiamento—and switch between them effortlessly throughout the day.”

According to Gaby, large music festivals are a defining feature of Willemstad, ranging from traditional tumba music to Bruno Mars. But one of the most memorable events that takes over the city center is Curaçao Pride, a celebration of LGBT community which runs from September 24 to 28. Visitors flock to Willemstad from all over the world to participate.

“Pride events on the island are getting bigger and better every year,” says Gaby. “Curaçaoans always know how to throw a good party.”

instagram:

Visiting the Vibrant, Colorful Cityscape Of Willemstad, Curaçao

For more vivid landscapes and architecture from the island of Curaçao, explore the Willemstad location page.

One of the first things visitors notice about Willemstad, the capitol of Curaçao, is its brightly colored houses. The Dutch-influenced architecture reflects the colonial history of the tiny island nation, located in the Caribbean Sea off the coast of Venezuela.

“The landscape and the people who live in this city are as diverse as they come,” says Gaby Lieuw (@sandandstilettos), who grew up in Curaçao and currently runs a travel service for tourists to the island. “Many people speak at least four languages fluently—Dutch, English, Spanish and the local language of Papiamento—and switch between them effortlessly throughout the day.”

According to Gaby, large music festivals are a defining feature of Willemstad, ranging from traditional tumba music to Bruno Mars. But one of the most memorable events that takes over the city center is Curaçao Pride, a celebration of LGBT community which runs from September 24 to 28. Visitors flock to Willemstad from all over the world to participate.

“Pride events on the island are getting bigger and better every year,” says Gaby. “Curaçaoans always know how to throw a good party.”

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